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Contact

Webber London

Webber London
18 Newman Street,
London W1T 1PE

+44 (0)20 7439 0678
london@webberrepresents.com

Webber Gallery
18 Newman Street,
London W1T 1PE
info@webber.gallery

Webber New York

Webber New York
Roulston House, Suite 248
124 9th Street
Brooklyn
NY11215

+1 212 343 7491
newyork@webberrepresents.com

Webber LA

Webber LA
939 S Santa Fe Ave
Los Angeles
CA 90021

la@webberrepresents.com
info@webber.gallery

Careers

Position: Accounts Assistant

Company: Webber Represents (London office)

Start Date: Immediate

Salary: £23k

WEBBER is a thriving multidisciplinary agency and gallery that harmonizes creativity and collaboration with contemporary lens-based artists and clients. As we’re going through a period of re-imagination, we want to nurture a space that respectfully involves and empowers individuals who have been historically denied access within our industry. We’re a small team looking for an ACCOUNTS ASSISTANT, to work alongside our Senior Accountant and Agents and Producers with enthusiasm and efficiency. The successful applicant should be a proactive, self-motivated and an extremely organised individual with excellent people skills and a keen eye for detail. Webber is a busy and evolving creative agency set to expand, with exceptional career growth potential.


Responsibilities:

Accounts receivable duties including but not limited to:

  • Creating, posting and sending out client invoices
  • Initial stage credit control
  • Working with the production team to ensure timely job invoicing
  • Handling client queries
  • Completing the necessary forms and customer portal setups

Accounts payable duties including but not limited to:

  • Upload of supplier invoices via ApprovalMax
  • Daily maintenance of the dedicated Accounts Payable inbox
  • Preparation of weekly payment runs
  • Supplier statement reconciliations
  • Debit & Credit Card reconciliation

Additional responsibilities:

  • Assisting the production team with budget reconciliation queries
  • Assisting in preparation of profitability reports across agency subdivisions

Software Experience:

  • Microsoft Word & Excel (Basic)
  • Quickbooks (Training given)
  • Lookbooks (Training given)
  • Adobe Creative Suite, in particular acrobat (Preferable but not essential)


Please send cover letter and CV to Jan Phipps jan@webberrepresents.com

Webber

Thomas Albdorf Room With a View | Foam 15.06–09.09.18

Thomas Albdorf, Room With a View | Foam
15.06–09.09.18

Information

Thomas Albdorf
Room With a View

Foam Museum, Amsterdam
15 June - 9 September 2018

Foam presents the first solo museum exhibition of Thomas Albdorf (1982, Austria). The artist created a new body of work especially for this exhibition, which is displayed for the very first time in Foam. The works present a surreal account of what looks like a most peculiar Mediterranean holiday. We recognise volcanic landscapes that could have been snapped during a hike, marble sculptures and pottery typically found at the museum or in the souvenir shop, and a pizza dinner that could have been posted on Instagram. Whether the artist ever left his studio to document this place remains unresolved: his initial footage was sourced from google maps, google image search, social media and commercial image banks. The work is shown alongside other recent series General View (2017) and I Know I Will See What I Have Seen Before (2015), that are loosely inspired by a trip to Yosemite National Park and his native Austria, respectively.

Albdorf combines classic photographic genres with contemporary visual techniques. His landscapes and still-lifes are boldly aesthetic, but his use of the photographic medium is highly conceptual. Using both analogue and digital techniques, Albdorf constructs fictional realities from photographs of persistent visual clichés found online. His images of a mountainous landscape, a beach holiday or a flower arrangement look familiar at first glance, but are effectively impossible. Albdorf typically submits his constructions to image recognition software to see if the program could be tricked into identifying his fictions as ‘real’.

By subtly tweaking the most prolific online stereotypes through manual interventions and imaging software, Albdorf deliberately picks apart universally recognisable visual clichés. Despite the aesthetics and humour of Albdorf’s work, decorum and digital trickery are not the end game here. They are but tools with which Albdorf addresses a more fundamental issue: the inherently flawed and self-referential imaging technologies we increasingly rely on as our window onto the world.

Text by Hinde Haest